Shooting victim shakes head at court again

Shooting victim shakes head at court again

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(File photo by Lyonel Doherty) Wayne Belleville definitely has a different outlook on life after nearly losing it to prolific offender Ronald Teneycke. Here, Belleville shares a moment with one of his constant companions, who never left his side during the ordeal.

Lyonel Doherty
Oliver Chronicle

Wayne Belleville wonders if he’ll ever stop hearing about the man who shot him in the back and left him for dead three years ago.

The victim can’t help but shake his head at the latest concessions the court has given dangerous offender Ronald Teneycke, who is serving an indefinite jail sentence for his crime spree in Oliver in 2015.

This week Teneycke was sentenced to an additional nine months of jail time for writing a letter to Belleville last Christmas while under a no-contact order. The letter was written from inside a federal prison, where officials have not explained how or why it happened.

In the latest twist, Penticton Crown Counsel admitted to an administrative error that will send Teneycke back to court in June to answer to the no-contact breach. Apparently, Teneycke did not officially enter a plea to the charge, despite the fact he admitted his non-compliance to the judge in a letter.

Now the entire proceeding must start over.

“Have we not wasted enough time on this f—ing a–hole?” Belleville said after hearing about the error. “Three years after and he’s still committing criminal offences while incarcerated.”

In the letter, Teneycke invited Belleville to visit him in prison (in Agassiz).

“If you visit for closure, I promise that I will not hurt you. If you attempt to strike me, I will kick your ass. So behave yourself.”

 • See more: Teneycke sends Christmas card letter to victim

During the police manhunt for the offender in 2015, Teneycke had robbed Eastside Grocery in Oliver and fled to the hills east of town. A few days later Belleville picked up Teneycke who posed as a hitchhiker on the road to Mount Baldy. After realizing who the criminal was, Belleville grabbed his truck keys and fled the vehicle, at which point Teneycke shot him in the back, rupturing his spleen.

According to Belleville, the offender was going to shoot him again when a vehicle approached and scared him off. Teneycke was subsequently arrested after a confrontation with police in a Cawston orchard.

In the letter, Teneycke wrote: “When I am straight, Wayne, I am a nice person. Knowing that should help you move forward.”

But Belleville said Teneycke is a sociopath who will hurt people if he can.

In one sentence, Teneycke wrote that he will always be disappointed in himself for shooting Belleville, but in another sentence he wrote: “I still feel no empathy for having shot you.”

Teneycke continued by saying he would not have shot Belleville in the back had he not taken the truck keys and ran off.

Teneycke said he accepts criminal responsibility for his behaviour and agrees with the court that he is a dangerous offender.

“Have a merry Christmas, your unknown, Ron.”

Belleville said giving Teneycke an additional nine months doesn’t change anything since he will serve them concurrently with his existing sentence. But he did point out the offender “shot himself in the foot” by writing the letter, hindering any potential for parole.

Belleville said the most irritating part is he was never informed about the administrative error; he only heard about it in the media.

He is also bothered by the federal prison system that doesn’t have to justify anything to anyone.

“They won’t even admit they made a mistake.”

Belleville expressed his concern about the court proceedings having to start all over again, adding that Teneycke could plead not guilty and trigger a new trial, which would be “another holiday” for the offender.

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