Proliferation of signs irk directors

Proliferation of signs irk directors

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It’s the sign of the times, but some regional directors are getting fed up with it.
The proliferation of signs was the topic of discussion at a recent board meeting, where a number of directors agreed that stricter enforcement of sign regulations was necessary.
As a result, the board carried a motion to establish sign enforcement priorities, including writing to local MLAs and the Ministry of Transportation about signs encroaching on highway right-of-ways.
Area A director Mark Pendergraft said they need a bylaw that limits the number of signs on private land.
Osoyoos Mayor Stu Wells said the signs proliferating the entranceway to Osoyoos is “absolutely terrible.”
Wells said they’ve lost the natural viewscape because of these signs, noting you can’t even seek Okanagan Lake because of the billboards as you enter Kelowna.
Wells said he hopes the board finds a way to start controlling this proliferation.
“It’s really over the top in Osoyoos. Believe me it’s coming to a neighbourhood near you.”
Wells said perhaps it’s time for some consumer advocacy. He noted erecting these signs may not be the best way to attract customers.
Area D director Tom Siddon said they should write letters to property owners when signs start to clutter up intersections.
“We should write letters to Pattison Signs. We want this blight on the environment out of here.”
Director George Bush said he doesn’t agree with eliminating all of the signs, but without rules and regulations you can’t control them.
Director Karla Kozakevich said there are so many signs that, after a while, you don’t really see them because they all blend in with each other.
Bill Newell, the regional district’s chief administrative officer, said their bylaw does not apply to highway property, but does regulate signs on private property. He noted the regional district has been reluctant to enforce its sign bylaw in the past.

6 COMMENTS

  1. I have noticed the signs and am saddened by them. We live in one of the most gorgeous landscapes in North America (and after much travel, i would be willing to debate the world) 97 is reminding me of the Florida Interstates where I used to vacation and areas of Europe that have sold out to businesses…congested with flash advertising that soils the beauty of the landscape. Does it make a point? If these businesses want their name to be remembered, they are working…against them. I won’t support their businesses because I don’t condone littering!!!!

  2. People might start a social-media movement against the companies that advertise on these billboards. Obviously Pattison and the land-owners don’t care.
    Send your protests to the advertisers . . . no advertiser, no billboard.

    Billboards are no more than “Litter-on-a-Stick” and they completely obliterate the beauty of the Okanagan.

  3. Yes, the Pattison signs need to go.

    Our culture has degraded to a fat, naked man (Harper) sipping a Tim Horton’s cup. Now, imagine that as an antiquity in a thousand years. I wonder what they will think of us.

  4. I love seeing signs for various things. It makes me feel like the town is doing things. While I love the nature and beauty of the South Okanagan – there is no place on earth as beautiful – no one can prosper here unless we welcome business-minded activity in the community. That is why the NDP didn’t win – we need jobs and we need to be environmentally responsible. Environmental responsibility on its’ own does not a community make.

  5. Your October 2nd article is accompanied by a photo of the official Department of Highways very tasteful wine route signs. I don’t think this is what the public is protesting is it. I believe the complaint is against the rash of large billboards approaching and leaving towns an cities throughout the Okanagan and the sea of home made signs in all shapes and sizes on all roadways.

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