Our people come first

Our people come first

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I assure you that without question Enbridge should never be allowed to lay pipelines through our mountainous BC, through the Douglas Channel embracing Kitimat and on.

Please get a map of BC out and look at our coastline, it is one of the most hazardous in the world. The Douglas Channel is the longest and possibly the most difficult to manoeuvre.

An accident is not a question of never happening but when. Damage unlimited! All that area and in to the Dutch Steel planned fracking for gas has been cancelled thanks to the stand taken by the First Nations.

I have been through that area and it is one of the greatest salmon spawning rivers in the world. We need to make big business realize that our earth and people come first.

We may have to take life at a slower pace and consider our surroundings, wildlife and our health. We need to take a stand and voice our opinions!

Since the free trade much of our industry has moved out of Canada into the Asian countries. Now they want our resources to keep them busy. How crass can our governments become?

We Canadians have become too Liberal in our attitude and big business has under-Conservative thinking taken every advantage. The big bucks count for them. Big everything, and I do not have to point anything out. Not good enough when they buck the unions because of people demanding a decent wage.

Because of big business running to poor countries, setting them up, allowing low wages, we will find decreasing sales and livelihood in Canada. In a generation or two who will reap the benefits? Even a cave might look good!

 

Agnes Sutherland, Oliver

 

Care aides are crucial 

October 18 is Health Care Assistant Day.

First proclaimed by the provincial government in 2011, it’s a time to recognize the skill and commitment B.C.’s care aides and community health workers bring to health care’s front lines.

Health care assistants are the backbone of personal care and support in our long-term care homes, the community, and increasingly, in our hospitals.

They provide seniors and others with every aspect of personal care – from feeding, toileting, dental care and bathing to comforting those who are confused, afraid, or in the final stages of life.

And they do it in the face of significant obstacles that undermine the quality of care they are able to provide.

For too long, government has ignored the warning signs that come from not having sufficient staff to provide the level and quality of care British Columbians deserve.

In B.C.’s residential care facilities, for example, it has become typical for care aides to try and meet the needs of their often frail, elderly residents, without being given enough time to do the job.

They are literally being run off their feet, which results in more injuries, illness, and too frequently, burnout.

And when staff are not able to be there for someone – who may be lonely, agitated, or near death – a whole other level of stress kicks in.

In 2011, the B.C.’s Ombudsperson’s landmark investigation into seniors’ care called for higher staffing levels and enforceable standards for key aspects of resident care – bathing, meal preparation, and recreational services.

It’s time to heed her call. And it’s time to admit that focussing solely on the bottom line is not working.

Scrimping on human resources may save a few dollars in the short term. But once you add up the additional costs that come from increased injuries and sick time, there are no long-term savings to be found by under staffing.

As the union representing the vast majority of care aides and community health workers in B.C., HEU is calling for the changes needed to ensure staff have the time they need to provide quality care.

Without that basic investment, our seniors will continue to lose out and our care aides and community support workers will continue to burn out.

It’s time to care. It’s time to invest in people – the people who need care, and the people who provide it.

 

Bonnie Pearson, secretary-business manager, Hospital Employees’ Union

 

Too much junk television

Broadcasters are a window on the world from different perspectives that animate their information projects..

The right thing is to promote television events focused on causes such as peace, economic and social progress, security and coexistence among people from heterogeneous cultures. This will promote a television that in addition to distract, encourages a culture of peace, security and development.

But violence, crude morbidity and sex have become the mainstay of many television programs. The competitiveness is not based on a serious and responsible programming, but to attract the public with a banal and crude content, on the border of what is ethically permissible.

It is necessary to take appropriate action against the epidemic of vulgarity and eroticism that pervades the small screen and it just gets degrade the viewer. It is urgent to stop emitting all series violent, insolent and erotic.

It is not wrong to spend hours in front of the TV but the social passivity is wrong, because it involves not knowing to look for other ways to fill the leisure time. It is the empirical proof that something is wrong. It looks as if reading, conversation, family gatherings, meeting friends or study, would have become things of another world.

This issue becomes more serious when children are those who spend many hours in front of televisions, and even a third of their waking hours, and beyond children’s programming schedules. The Code of Self-Regulation of Child Time emissions of 17 to 20 hours, signed by the television networks and the Government in Spain, has been infringed, persistently, by all broadcasters.

In turn, young people who watch television three hours a day suffer an increased risk in interest in their training for youth and start their adult life, according to the researchs conducted by the University of Columbia and the Psychiatric Institute of New York.

Finally, the director of Disney Channel says, “we have a vocation to be a TV with family programming, dedicated to children up to 12 years. Our distinctive value is precisely the family”. This chain could be the alternative to the “Junk TV” chains with national coverage.

Clemente Ferrer, president, European Institute of Marketing

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